When you think about freedom and ageing well, what pops into your mind? Is freedom an oxymoron or can you step into an even greater personal power in your 60s and beyond? 

Over the years of work with my clients, I’ve noticed a pattern when it comes to unlocking personal freedom and ageing well. Here are the 3 keys to freedom that I have identified:

Don’t Worry

Many of us worry how well we will fare when we grow older. Will we act similarly to our parents, perhaps? Experience same problems and illnesses? It’s inevitable, really, to worry or wonder what might or will happen to us as we enter our 60s and beyond.

Of course, most of us are pleasantly surprised because through wisdom and experience we learn a vital freedom-rich secret, which is not to worry. That it is what it is.

In fact, take note of this lovely Tibetan saying: “If you can do something about it, then why worry? And if you can’t do anything about it, then why worry?”

Actually, it makes sense because it’s impossible to second-guess others. On average, we have 60,000 thoughts going around in our minds in any 24 hours, so how can we know what other people are thinking about us?

As importantly, if you really want to think about it, how many of us can discern every thought that goes around in our very own minds at any given time?

One of the ways we learn how to move into this freedom from restriction is to discern the difference between expectations and reality.

Many of us juggle the balls of work and home life where we can be restricted by expectations from others as well as our own. Along the way, we worry about ‘fitting in.’ Especially if we’re climbing up the slippery – and political – career ladder and trying to have time off for children.

As we aim high in our expectations, we find ourselves not wanting to “rock the boat.” After all, juggling work and home life takes a set of expert skills! As our work and home life change in our 40s and 50s, now’s the time to expand our freedom.

It can begin with taking your personal power back. You no longer need to walk on eggshells, worrying about what people think. In fact, if you must worry at all, worry about where your own freedom is restricted. Begin with asking for what you want because you are worth it.

After all these years, it should now be about your own self-worth, living by your own set of values. If you are a caring and sensitive soul, let’s be very clear: it is a fact that we cannot nurture others from a dry well!

As we all move through the gateway into our sixth decade, there are vital secrets we need to know and learn in order to enhance our personal power and thus age well. One vital key is learning to live in the moment, with the first step being not to worry.

This is what the gateway into your sixth decade is all about: moving into a greater sense of your own self.

Be True to Your Dreams

Are you following what makes your heart sing? Are you in alignment with the dreams of your earliest years? Life has a way of taking us everywhere but where our heart really lies – in that special and sacred space where we can lose ourselves in joy, peace and creativity.

Two clients of mine, with a combined age (wisdom and experience) of 128 years, recently began a new business together. Their hearts were calling to them and they wanted to revolt against the expectation that when you’re in your 60s or older, work will cease.

But instead they were setting up a new business! They told me they could identify with their childhood dreams, and in opening up to them, they were experiencing a new surge of energy.

I see this pattern again and again: a person’s working career may take them into law or engineering, yet on the inside they have always been an artist. Poetry, painting, writing, any form of self-expression is what makes their heart beat.

This is exactly how my clients were looking at their lives right now. They were honouring the artist inside of them.

When we listen to our hearts and our dreams and act upon them, our payback will be more energy and vitality. My clients’ power of self-determination was giving them their longed for freedom to be in alignment with their childhood dreams.

Remember: It Is What It Is, and I Am Who I Am

Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones gave an interview where he said, “When I reach an age where I’m unable to look after myself easily, don’t assume I’ll want to be taken on outings with others of a similar age. No, I’ll want my independence to the end, marijuana on tap; and any carers will need to be young, pretty and with short skirts!”

OK, so we might not all subscribe to Bill Wyman’s vision, but at least his view was a humorous one, where having fun and maintaining independence were high up on his list.

What pops into your mind when you think of freedom and aging well? I’m curious to hear your thoughts, so please join the conversation!

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