January is here and with the winter weather in full force, I can’t think of a better time to curl up on the sofa with a good book! This month, as the smell of smoke fills the air and the landscape is painted a thousand shades of grey and white, we have some excellent book recommendations from our Sixty and Me sisters.

From historical fiction to science-fiction, there is sure to be something for you. Enjoy the following books in good health and in good spirits.

Here are our community’s book recommendations for January.

 
 

Small Great Things, by Jodi Picoult

This New York Times Bestseller will make you think – about race, power, morality and your own perspective on the world. Read more about Small Great Things.

The Family Romanov, by Candace Fleming

I’ve been fascinated by Russian history and culture since my son moved there for work a decade ago. This critically acclaimed book provides a window into the fall of Russia’s last imperial family. The story takes on special significance when one considers the political and sociological forces facing the world today. Read more about The Family Romanov.

The Martian, by Andy Weir

The Martian is honestly one of the funniest books that I have read in a long time. Talking with other women, it seems like a book that either has you in stitches or scratching your head wondering what all the fuss is about. The story centers around an astronaut who is trapped on Mars. Through his creativity and force of will he battles nature – and himself – in his mission to get home safely. Read more about The Martian.

A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki

This is a story about a 16-year-old girl who feels like her life has no future. Struggling with her place in the world, Nao decides to document the life of her great-grandmother, a Buddhist nun. This decision leads her on a path that will change the course of her life. Read more about A Tale for the Time Being.

The Guernsey Literary Potato and Peel Pie Society, by Annie Barrows

At 290 pages, The Guernsey Literary Potato and Peel Pie Society is not a long book. But, what it lacks in length, it makes up for in style, humor and beautiful writing. The story is built around a series of letters, which begin in 1946. The San Francisco Chronical called this book “Traditional without seeming stale, and romantic without being naïve.” Read more about The Guernsey Literary Potato and Peel Pie Society.

Stoner, by John Williams

Set in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Stoner is a classic story about a man’s silent battle to discover himself. The main character, William Stoner, abandons agronomy in favor of literature, battles external forces and connects with his inner-self. The book shows that normal people can be heroes. Read more about Stoner.

When Breath Becomes Air, by Paul Kalanithi

This is the story of a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi, who is diagnosed with stage IV cancer and must suddenly come to grips with his own mortality. It raises important questions for all of us, even if we feel like we have many decades left on this beautiful planet of ours. Read more about When Breath Becomes Air.

The Nest, by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

This humorous novel about a troubled family will have you smiling from ear to ear. As the New York Times Book Review said, “Humor and delightful irony abound in this lively first novel.” Read more about The Nest.

The Elegance of the Hedgehog, by Muriel Barbery

Renée and Paloma are not at all what they seem. Fearing rejection, they hide their special passions and talents from the world. As their friendship develops, they discover their true value as individuals. Read more about The Elegance of the Hedgehog.

Have you read any of the books featured in this month’s list of book recommendations? What did you think of them? Please join the conversation.

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