They say that there is always an element of truth in every sarcastic comment. And, the same is often true for clichés and stereotypes. Well, if this is true, then a recent comedy sketch by a group of Australian millennials may offer some fascinating insights into just how our kids and grandkids see us.

Take a look at the comedy sketch and you’ll see what I mean. Then, let’s have a chat about how much of this video is based on truth… and how much is just a regurgitation of tired old stereotypes.

In the comedy sketch, which was recorded for ABC in Australia, a group of millennials pokes fun at us older adults, taking aim at our apathy for the environment, economic success, technological backwardness and quirky behavior.

Are All Boomers Really Rich?

For example, one of the presenters, Bridie Connell is amazed that her interviewee actually owns her house. As she says, “Owning an entire house might seem to you or I like something the Queen of England does, but, in the Boomer community, it’s perfectly normal to own the property you live in, effectively making you your own landlord.”

By the way, there’s actually quite a bit of truth to this statement. According to cencus.gov, in the U.S. approximately 35% of people under 35 own their own home. By contrast, 80% of baby boomers are home owners.

Another popular complaint that millennials have about baby boomers is that we are responsible for holding them back financially.

Are Boomers Responsible for Millennials’ Financial Woes?

For example, in the comedy skit, ABC’s Ben Jenkins says “It might seem fun or cool to destroy the entire economy with multiple highly-leveraged investment properties, or to write a nine-page letter to ABC about an arcane pronunciation issue that nobody gives a s–t about, but, we need to get across the message to boomers that this sort of behavior is just not on.”

Of course, if it no secret that millennials are struggling financially. In fact, approximately 33% of millennials is still living with their parents. So, it is no surprise that they feel somewhat passed over in terms of financial success. Still, the idea that boomers are to blame for all of the world’s financial problems is, at best, an oversimplification and, at worst, a dangerous retreat from the concepts of self-reliance and personal responsibility.

Are Our Twitter and Facebook Habits Out of Control?

Finally, the skit took aim at some of our technology habits, specifically the ways in which we supposedly use Twitter and Facebook.

As Connell says, “Despite only having a short amount of time left on Earth, boomers choose to spend a lot of it on Twitter.”

Her boomer guest responds that “Facebook and Twitter have opened up a whole new world for the boomer community. Before that, we had to wait for big family gatherings so that we could bother people with our stupid questions about what’s happening (on our favorite TV shows).”

Now, I’m willing to grant that not all boomers I know use social media responsibly. But, come on millennials. You’re the ones who thought that an app called “Yo!” that, you guessed it, allowed people to send single word “yo’s” to each other, was a pretty neat idea. So, let’s not talk about who uses technology in the craziest ways!

I don’t know about you, but, I have nothing but love and respect for the millennials in my family. So, I hope that most millennials see that we are actually on their side. Either way, there were a few funny moments in this video, even if the actual jokes stretched the truth.

What are some stereotypes about boomers that you have heard before? Do you think that the comedy skit that we shared was funny? Why or why not? Let’s have a chat!

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