Making friends as an adult is always difficult, but, it’s not until we reach our 50s and 60s that things really start to get interesting.

For most of our lives, our friendships follow our social context. As kids, our lives are filled with schoolmates, neighbors and teammates. As parents, we follow our kids to BBQs, sports events and school activities. When we are building our careers, our co-workers are a constant source of social contact – even if we wish that they weren’t.

Why is Making Friends as Adult So Difficult?

As we reach our 50s and 60s, our social circumstances start to change. As we start to think about retirement, many of us worry that loneliness is just around the corner.

On the positive side, many of us find ourselves with more time to spare as we get a little older. But, there is still a lingering doubt that we will be able to put this time to good use and make new friends who share our interests.

This is more than just an idle concern. Loneliness has been linked to health concerns among older adults and can contribute to depression and anxiety.

Is there a Silver Lining to Getting Older?

On the positive side, many of us find ourselves with more time to spare as we get a little older. If we have hobbies and passions, this time can be channeled into activities that can help us to make new friends. Unfortunately, this is not always possible, either because we live in a geographically isolated location or because we don’t have the energy to engage with the world.

There is still a lingering doubt that we will be able to put this time to good use and make new friends who share our interests.

I’m really curious to hear what you think about this topic. Do you think that it gets easier or harder to make friends after 60? Please vote below and then join the conversation in the comments section at the end of this article.

Do you think that making friends as an adult is easy? Why? What advice would you give to a friend who is looking to make new friends after 60? Please join the discussion and “like” and share this article to keep the conversation going.

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