This was the most rain I had seen for many years. Winter was a major challenge. I live in remote mountains, in the bowl of Mill Creek, in magical Big Sur. The environment continues to challenge all of us.

This land gets the benefit of shelter from Cone Peak, which translates into clouds bouncing back to return with more rain rather than blowing over the edge of the Santa Lucia Mountains. We got plenty of moisture, and the trees and grasses are overjoyed.

I am among the fortunate who can come and go from this land with relative reliability. During a very challenging period of roads being closed, major landslides have redefined the road circuit for months or perhaps years. A key bridge is missing, having been disabled by the rains.

 
 

These challenges make me notice even more the beauty of the area, and to examine closely what Nature is having me notice during this time. I’ve been thrown back on my own resources over the last year more than I could have imagined. The challenge continues.

The Hope of Spring

Ahh, spring! The days get longer, the frogs are singing their songs in the evening. The first sprouts bring hope and inspiration and show the power of hope and perseverance.

The growth continues. The grasses get taller. In just three weeks, the paths have filled up with vegetation. The simple act of crossing the front yard becomes a feat of picking a path through waist-high grasses!

The wisteria is just now showering lavender and white, poised above the cerinthe, with its dark purple. Cerinthe came up thickly this year and presents a great contrast to the calla lilies in the back. This is a small sample of the jungle that I call my yard.

Fortunately, I am blessed with having my pathways weed-whacked so that I can see the beauty of the fruit trees and of the land itself, sculpted out of the huge mass of growth.

Clearing out the overgrowth so that the beauty of the plant forms is visible is a never-ending labor of love. Without a firm hand, the whole thing can quickly devolve into weeds and overgrowth, the beauties of the plants obscured.

Nature is a Great Metaphor for Creativity

Life is like a garden, with new things coming forth every day to be seen and noticed. So many ideas, and where does the energy to fulfill them come from? How can you tell when something is really a great idea, and when it needs to be cut down so that you can see what is really all around you?

Having an internal reference point, a clear vision of your purpose, gives us guidance as the world bombards us with images. It helps us prioritize ideas competing for importance. When you have a feeling of order within you, and a sense of purpose, it makes clearing away the things that don’t really matter much simpler. It may not be easy, but it’s simple.

What is your inner voice telling you about how to clear your path? Taking one simple step at a time will get you into a habit of making small improvements to your situation.

Over time, these add up, and the changes you are creating begin to form new patterns that can support you. Imagine how it would feel to move closer to being able to walk freely through the garden, and to enjoy the sights, sounds and smells.

How do you find inspiration in nature? Is there one little thing that you can do right now to make your life simpler and more enjoyable? What is it? Please share in the comments.

Betty WithrowBetty Withrow is a creativity and life purpose coach, helping artistic and professional women to find a deeper engagement with their life processes, to use the skills and experience we have in creating a dynamic third-act life. Clarity of purpose, vivid life experiences, and a true sense of legacy are her special interests. She is the author of Prevail: Seven Keys to Create a Personal Victory.

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