I love my body – really? Be honest, have you ever said that to yourself? Or is it more typical of you to say, “I hate my body,” or “I hate my thighs,” or “My breasts sag”?

We lament the fact that we are not “perfect.” What would happen if you changed the words and started saying “I love my body”?

Our ancient brain was programmed to look more for the negative as a means of survival. Back in time, if you weren’t alert for wild predators, you surely would not live long. Couple that wired-in tendency to look at what’s wrong with the relentless body-brushed models in the media, and it’s no wonder we are always negative about ourselves.

 
 

Let’s say you want to lose weight. Perhaps the decision came from seeing a photograph of yourself that made you aware you had gained quite a bit without realizing it. You might look at yourself with disgust, and as a result start a strict diet, depriving yourself from all pleasure around eating.

Or you might choose to look and decide you’ve been neglecting yourself by not nourishing your body with the right foods. Which thought process do you think would lead to a positive outcome?

Suffering

We are not meant to suffer. The 60 & Me community is all about the preciousness of life, the benefits of gratitude and the wisdom that comes with growing older. I believe it is that positivity that draws each of us to tune in to founder Margaret Manning’s wisdom.

Practice Gratitude

Gratitude for the bodies we have is just the right place to start making changes for the better. After all, we are here, alive. Many belief systems refer to the body as the temple of the soul. Looking from that perspective, shouldn’t we honor and care for it, instead of criticizing its every flaw?

Appreciate Pain

While we may not like it, pain is an important signal from the body that something is not working right. Listen to the words you use when you are in pain. Do you say “I have a bad arm” or “My arm is hurting so I will let it rest”?

It may be a stretch to love your pain, but acknowledging it, and offering compassion to whatever part of your body hurts can be healing in itself.

You may use words that disconnect you from a painful part of your body, disowning it by calling it “the leg” or “the neck.” It is your leg and your neck; owning it will reconnect you and integrate it into the whole of you. By owning it you can send loving compassion to your very self.

I Love My Body – Affirmations for Honoring Your Body

Affirmations are simple positive statements. They are best said in the present tense, as if they are already true. Research shows that our unconscious mind believes what we say is true, so why not practice affirmative statements as if they are already happening?

You can find some examples in my recordings Beyond Cancer and Stress Management.

 Some Personal Affirmations

  • I love my body just as it is.
  • I take care of my body with loving kindness.
  • I eat nourishing foods to keep me healthy and happy.
  • My body is beautiful.
  • I appreciate all that my body does for me.

Your body is magnificent. It is unique. It houses your mind, heart and spirit. What could be more precious? If you view your body in this way, how can you not take good care of it?

What do you think about your body? Do you have a negative or a positive attitude toward your body? How willing are you to change it? What are some of the positive things you would like to say to your body? Please join the conversation below!

Peg DoylePeg Doyle is a healthy eating and lifelong wellness expert, recording artist, motivational speaker and author. She is passionate about the impact of quality food and a balanced lifestyle on women’s health. Her mission is to make healthy eating easy and appealing, using nourishment as a powerful tool for preventing the so-called diseases of aging. You can visit her website here.

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