Faced with the common problem of the hooded eye, you have several options, Botox being one of them. But it’s not the only one, and professional makeup artist Ariane Poole is here to show us how makeup can take care of the issue. Enjoy the show!

Margaret Manning:

Today we are going to be inspired by a good friend of Sixty and Me, professional makeup artist Ariane Poole. Ariane has been making celebrities and royalty look beautiful for years, and now she’s also focusing on teaching women our age how to use new products and techniques to make us look the best we can in our 60s. Hi, Ariane, and welcome.

Ariane Poole:

Hi there, Margaret. Hello, community.

Margaret:

Our community loves you, and today we want to ask you what to do with hooded eyes. Mainly, the question is how to apply makeup in a way that can minimize that look where the bottom side of your brow skin falls over the top of your eyelids.

Ariane:

Actually, there are two different types of hooded eyes. The one is called vanishing lid, and it’s something that you’re born with. When you have vanishing lid, the skin below the brow goes down over the top of the eyelid, covering it completely. It’s very common here in the UK.

There’s a technique you can do to open up the eye and make it look bigger with that kind of shape, but you should be aware that it does get worse as you get older because of gravity.

The other type of hooded eye is the one you experience with age. I have it too, and it’s when the skin above the eye drops down over the lid. Of course, you can get that fixed with Botox, and that’s fine, but I’m one of those people who doesn’t want to do that.

Margaret:

Either choice is good. There are no rules, really.

Ariane:

If you’ve decided Botox is not for you, I’ll show you what you can do if you have hooded eyes. First of all, I want to clarify that the technique I use is different depending on the shape and how extreme the hooded eye is.

If the front section of the area above the eye is coming down, our goal is to lift that area up. So, I take a little bit of my Crystal Taupe, or any other eye shadow, and apply it over the eyelid then bring it slightly higher than my socket line. When you do that, it actually has a lifting effect and opens up the eye.

Margaret:

This looks great. The product you’re using is your Eye Shine in the Crystal Taupe tone, right?

Ariane:

Yes, but depending on the person’s eye color I might use the Topaz, which is like a golden color, or the amethyst, which is the purple one that you use.

Margaret:

Yes, I use it all the time.

Ariane:

There’s also the Graphite, which is the gray one that I use when I’m doing a smokier eye. I use this technique, because it lifts up the front area above the eye.

It’s also important that you leave the area below your brow arch, and to the side of your eye, bare. This is the area where your skin is probably the tightest and it appears naturally lighter.

I’m going to highlight the area at the end just to show you that it has the opposite effect – it brings the brow bone forward and sinks the eyes further back. You really want to avoid highlighting this area.

Margaret:

So, this is a new technique that I haven’t learned before. I’ve always known I should apply eyeshadow over the lid only. What you just said, to go a bit over the socket line, seems really useful if you’ve got hooded eyes.

Ariane:

Yes, and I use my finger because this way I can feel exactly how high to go – a little over the socket line, not all the way to the brow.

Margaret:

Ariane, I’ve seen tutorials where people put a lighter color shadow on the lower part of the lid, then a darker color a little bit above, to give a shape to the eye. Would you do that with a hooded eye? Or would you not mess with contouring?

Ariane:

I would take a slightly darker matte shade and apply it over the eyelid. If you’ve got the vanishing lid I mentioned earlier, you never had a socket line to begin with. I’ve heard people say that in those cases they try to recreate the socket line, but well, you never had one in the first place.

Also, your eyes don’t age evenly, so this leads to a lot of hard work. What I would do instead is, I’d take a taupe kind of color in matte and bring it slightly higher than the darker shade I applied previously. This technique really opens up the eye.

Margaret:

Yes, you’re right. That natural highlight that you talked about below your brow really helps a lot, and the darker shadow accentuates it a little bit.

Ariane:

Exactly. If you’ve got the kind of hooded eye that drops from the outer corner of the brow, I’d take a black pencil, like the Estée Lauder, and taking some color on my finger, I’d apply it above the eyeshadow.

I wouldn’t stop at the socket line, though. Instead, I’d bring it a bit over the hooded area. This way the darker shade of the pencil visually pushes back the bone, and that’s what you’re trying to achieve.

Margaret:

You’re right. It does. That’s a great technique and I’ve never seen it before. I also noticed that you’re keeping the shadow toward the center of your eye. You’re not going toward the inner side.

Ariane:

You noticed right. I’m only putting it on the outer half of the lid. But let me mention that I’m using quite a dark color for demonstration purposes. You can do different shades that work for you.

But the point is, I haven’t done any makeup on my other eye, and you can see the difference between the two. This technique is really useful to lift up the eyes visually.

Now, let me show you what happens if I put a shimmery highlight under my brow. I apply it with my finger, and you can see it really changes the dynamic of the eye, making the bone move forward and sinking the eye further back. It negates what I just did to lift the eye.

Margaret:

I can see how it sucks it back. Your eye actually looks smaller now.

Ariane:

Exactly, but if you keep only your natural skin highlight, with a concealer of some sort if you’ve got an uneven tone, it opens up the eye. Whereas now, the dynamic is lost, and my eye looks more hooded. Even if I put the darker color now, the effect wouldn’t be much better.

Margaret:

Also, it doesn’t look as attractive. This is a little like the painted lady look we’re all trying to avoid. It’s not really natural.

Ariane:

It certainly doesn’t bring out the eyes in the best possible way. I know a lot of tutorials instruct to put the lightest color all over the eye area, but don’t do that. That technique was useful in the olden days when eye shadows weren’t as blendable.

Eye shadows nowadays are super blendable. They’re easy to layer, so don’t use those old techniques anymore. Also, if you put a lighter color underneath, it makes it much harder to build up the depths that you need. You have to work harder to achieve the look you want.

Margaret:

So, would you advise against using the mineral pen under the brow?

Ariane:

If you have redness in that area, then you could use a more gentle, skin tone mineral pen.

I’ve noticed that when I’m giving makeup lessons to my groups of ladies, they always stop applying their eye shadow when they reach the socket line. And that’s too low, so I always instruct them to go higher. I know that it feels very odd because you’re thinking you’re going to look like a clown.

But when they do it, it really opens up the eye and looks great.

Margaret:

What color pencil are you using? Is it navy blue?

Ariane:

It’s a charcoaly-blacky-grayish kind, and I’m putting it just on the outer corner a bit above the eye. You may also notice that one of your eyes is droopier than the other. This is quite common. In fact, I have yet to meet somebody, especially as we age, that has a symmetrical face.

If one of your eyes is more hooded, I would put a little bit more of the darker color on it to create balance. That would lift it up.

Margaret:

Yes, it looks really great.

Ariane:

You can use all sorts of colors – plum-shade, browns, taupe. You don’t have to go as dark as I have.

Margaret:

This technique is very subtle, and I really love how you present everything. When you do it, it looks so easy. You make it look like the product isn’t what matters here, it’s the technique. It was quite interesting to see.

Ariane:

Yes, and I’m sure all ladies have these kinds of products in their makeup bag or drawer. They’re going to be able to do this technique quite easily with what they’ve got handy.

It’s really all about getting over the fear of putting it up higher than what you’re used to. Just go with it, and you’ll see it works really well.

Margaret:

This demonstration was wonderful, Ariane. I know women would be able to follow it, and the effect is just spectacular. It has changed the look of your eye area. It’s just a matter of getting it right.

Ariane:

And the technique is easy to do. Just feel the fear, and then do it anyway. Really, go with it.

Margaret:

It certainly works for you. I hope many of our women now feel empowered to deal with the hooded eye problem. As you mentioned, hooded eyes are quite common, and unless we want to go dramatic with Botox, this technique is something that we could embrace in our 60s and beyond.

As always, you were fantastic, Ariane. Thank you so much.

Ariane:

Thank you very much, Margaret. It’s always a pleasure.

Margaret:

Talk again soon. Bye.

Under the guidance of a makeup professional, would you try a new technique that could help with a problem like the hooded eye? Have you found any other tips that work with hooded eye? Please feel free to share your comments and questions in the box below.

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