The holidays are behind us, and you may think that the inappropriate behavior of your grandchildren is a thing of the past as well.

Time for a Reality Check

Unfortunately, the tantrums they threw over a toy they didn’t get from Santa, or the food they refused to eat at supper, or the meltdown at the supermarket because they couldn’t have a treat, are going to continue right into the new year.

The reality is that sometimes kids are naughty on purpose, and putting your foot down can send them into a tailspin, especially if their parents seldom do so.

At other times, we put our grandkids into what we think will be fun situations that eventually turn miserable. A trip to the theme park, a visit with the cousins, or a meal at a restaurant can lead to overstimulation and, ultimately, obnoxious misconduct.

There is Yet Hope to Bring Order

Regardless of the reasons, it’s essential for your sanity that you are able to bring the kids back to normal when a meltdown occurs. Although it’s probably not your job to restore order all the time, sometimes you may be the only grownup for the job.

Here are a few techniques to try the next time your sweet grandchild turns into a little monster:

Stay Calm

If they are shouting, don’t start shouting back. Refusing to react or get sucked into their tantrum is essential.

Meet the Child’s Basic Needs

Offering a drink of water, a snack, or a nap may nip the problem in the bud, so try this right away.

Remove the Child from the Situation

If you are in a public place or with a group, it might be necessary to take your grandchild to another area. For instance, if you are at a restaurant, go outside and take a little walk while you talk calmly, asking what will make him/her happy.

This will not only help the child, but it will allow all the other diners to enjoy their meal. No one wants to be around a screaming kid.

Get Cozy

If you are at home, bring the child into the bedroom and snuggle. Turn the lights down low, find a book, and begin to read with the child or look at the pictures. Although the little one may still be agitated, your job is to distract him/her with the calming sound of your voice.

These techniques may sound like common sense but keeping them in mind could help prevent a little hiccup from erupting into a full-blown storm. Next time you see the signs that a melt-down is imminent, remind yourself that you know how to handle the situation, and remain calm. You’ve got this!

How often do you have to deal with an agitated grandchild? What do you do to calm them down? Do you have any other tips to share? Please use the comment box to express your thoughts!

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