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Preparing YOU and Your Pantry for the Spring and Summer Season

By Peg Doyle April 21, 2022 Health and Fitness

With the worst of winter storms and ice behind us, we can safely put the snow shovel and ice melt away for another year. Windows open for fresh air and flowers make their annual appearance in all their splendor.

There’s always much to do in springtime – inside and outside our homes. Because mud season prevails in much of the cooler climates, addressing cleanup indoors first is the most practical approach to spring cleaning.

Put Yourself First

As a wellness specialist, I don’t limit spring cleaning to my home’s interior. I also undertake an annual nutritional cleanse and reboot and would encourage you to do the same.

Why? Transitioning from one season to the next takes energy and adjustment to changing temperatures, light and even our clothing. You may start the day wearing heavy clothing in April, May and even June, only to be shedding layers later in the day as the temperature rises.

You may also find you are more active in springtime and more prone to spraining an ankle or straining your back from spring cleanups. And for many, seasonal allergies appear and aggravate.

Nature, in all its wisdom, supplies us with seasonal foods that actually support the special challenges of this season! They grow naturally in damp soil and don’t mind cool nights. Eating these foods will help ‘spring clean’ your insides.

Along with this you might want to do a formal cleanse as I do with a preset menu of super clean and nourishing foods. You can learn more here about mine which is designed with very simple, easy to prepare meals, or check the web for one that works for you.

Now for the Pantry

This past week I checked the date stamp on all my canned goods and discarded expired ones. Then I vacuumed the cabinets and arranged foods by categories and thought about the different ways I would use them in warm weather.

For instance, my supply of beans and legumes would be used for salad and grain bowls in the warm weather, not stews and soups. I checked my inventory for canned goods I might want for warm weather meals, like artichokes, anchovies, olives, pickles and roasted peppers.

Next, I went through my supply of spices and herbs, all of which contribute to a tasty salad, vegetable dish or fish. For whole grains I like to have quinoa, Israeli couscous, and bulghur handy, as they all cook up fairly quickly. Knowing what’s in the pantry makes it much easier to plan meals spontaneously.

Perishables

These are fresh foods, mainly fruits and vegetables, that have a limited shelf life. Those most abundant in spring/early summer include arugula, artichokes, asparagus, beets, carrots, green beans, kale, mint, spinach, spring peas, lettuce of many varieties, strawberries, spring onions and radishes.

Note: Kale, spinach and strawberries are known to absorb high levels of pesticides when grown conventionally, so choose organic when buying these.

A visit to your local farm or Farmer’s Market will give you a good show of your region’s most abundant spring foods. Try some that are new to you that might tickle your taste buds.

Consciously changing your food and nourishing yourself with the best Nature has to offer will make for smooth sailing through an otherwise unpredictable windy damp season known as spring.

Is spring a favorite or a dreaded season for you? Join the conversation and share how you transition to warm weather.

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The Author

Peg Doyle is a healthy eating and lifelong wellness expert, recording artist, motivational speaker and author. She is passionate about the impact of quality food and a balanced lifestyle on women’s health. Her mission is to make healthy eating easy and appealing, using nourishment as a powerful tool for preventing the so-called diseases of aging. You can visit her website here http://www.wellnessandyou.com

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